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2016 Kellion Medal

50 years

Presented at 63rd Annual General Meeting of The Diabetic Association of South Australia Inc. Tuesday 25 October 2016, 10.00am at Diabetes SA, 159 Sir Donald Bradman Drive, Hilton SA 5033. Click here to download a copy of the printed booklet.

Diabetes SA is proud to announce the Kellion Victory Medal Recipients for 2015/2016, including:

Dr Antony Sangster

dr-antony-sangsterI was diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus in Sydney, late September 1966. I recall feeling very tired and drinking lots of cordial.

My GP at the time picked it up from my tiredness, acetone breath and sugar in urine. 10 days in hospital followed, with injection practice being into an orange. Not a good training practice for the real thing! At home the syringes were made of glass with separate steel needles. They were both boiled up on the stove with distilled water in an old aluminium can then moved to a butter dish filled with metho. I was relieved when disposable injection kits came along.

My parents were a great support and helped me in those early years and during the challenges of managing my sugar levels through the stormy seas of adolescence. Despite these challenges I managed to earn the Queen’s Scout and Duke of Edinburgh’s awards. I later developed a keen interest in sailing, canoeing and participated in dinghy sailing races and went on numerous white water trips in NSW and Victoria.

I studied Medicine at University of Sydney and spent lots of time walking to and from University and using the University’s swimming pool. From 1979 on I survived the years spent training as a new doctor in hospital including night duty and country practice. My endtraining was in General Practice and I worked in that and parallel disciplines in Queensland, NSW, Canberra and finally Adelaide until retirement in 2014 (in the end one has to balance the pluses and minuses of work with one’s life).

During some of these years helping out at diabetes camps for children was a great and humbling experience. In the 1990’s I had carpal tunnel and finger tendon release operations and in 2010, cataracts in both eyes treated. So far the rest of me is OK. Three great advances in diabetes for me are: introduction of home blood glucose monitoring; the new, more reliably absorbed insulins; the insulin pump (I started using a pump in 2011 and now wonder why I did not overcome my stubbornness and start on it much sooner).

Luck has been an important factor in my life with diabetes along with being cared for by great doctors, diabetes educators and dietitians, having a challenging occupation, meaningful exercise, persistent work on diet and food choices and great hobbies. That my wife, Debra, has supported me through thick and thin is a testament to her courage and love.

Kite making and flying is my most consistent hobby. The key to how a kite flies successfully embodies for me the key word in diabetes: balance.

Back to 2015/2016 Kellion Victory Medal Recipients

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