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2012 Kellion Medal Recipients

60 Years

Elizabeth Flint

Elizabeth-Flint

Diagnosed with diabetes in 1950, Elizabeth attended the first meeting of Diabetes SA and the first diabetic children's camp in 1956.

Elizabeth qualified as a registered Nurse in 1964 and continued her nursing education achieving certificates in Midwifery (Australia and United Kingdom) and Community Health, Diploma in Hospital Nursing and Ward Management and a Bachelor of Nursing  Studies.  Elizabeth spent most of her working life working in Community Health in Gawler SA.

Elizabeth has enjoyed travelling in Australia and overseas, and enjoys a good social life.

Elizabeth is a Fellow of the Australian College of Nursing and was awarded an Order of Australian Merit (OAM) in 2011.  Elizabeth retired last year. She believes 'Diabetes lives with you, not you live with diabetes.'

Patricia Richards

Patricia-Richards

Patricia was diagnosed with diabetes in August 1952, aged nine years. Patricia was a healthy well adjusted child until she became ill in the summer of 1952. Patricia started insulin and a controlled diet called The Black and Red Line diet. She found it difficult for a time, as she was looked on as being different by people ignorant of the condition.

In 1960 her parents emigrated to Adelaide. Patricia started teacher training in 1963 which led to postings in Adelaide, Murray Bridge and Port Pirie.

Patricia met her husband in Murray Bridge and has been married for 41 years. They have two children. According to her mother, Patricia was a very 'good' diabetic looking after her health and making it easier for her family.

Patricia's interests include travelling, embroidery, reading, photography, learning French, gardening, Tai-Chi and keeping up with friends and family.

Joan Schulz

Joan-Schulz

Joan developed diabetes when she was 15. At 17 she decided not to have any more insulin. Her father had told her of a mixture that had helped a friend, so she took this for about a year and got into trouble, of course, and was told to never do that again.

Later Joan had four children; two boys and two girls. Three were delivered by caesarean and the other was a natural birth, but six weeks premature. She went to the diabetes clinic at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital and was called the 'naughty diabetic' for many years.

As a result of diabetes, Joan had a triple bypass 15 years ago.

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