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2018 Teen Camp for teens with type 1 diabetes

Diabetes SA will be holding their annual Teen Camp for teens with type 1 diabetes, at Mylor Baptist Camp on Saturday 17 to Sunday 18 February 2018.

The camp is for teenagers aged 13-16 years at the time of camp.

Keep your eye out for expressions of interest that will be arriving in the mail soon.

  • Click here to download .pdf 2018 Teen Camp - Expression of Interest.

Please contact Diabetes SA if your contact details have changed or you have not received an expression of interest. 

All expressions of interest close of 22 December 2017.

Diabetes SA cannot run these camps without the support of staff, volunteers and leaders. If you are interested in any of these roles, please contact Health Services at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or 1300 198 204.

Would you like to find out more about Teen Camps?

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ndss-15mm

The National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) is an initiative of the Australian Government administered by Diabetes Australia.

 
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And the winners are...

live-it-up-2017-logoThank you to all Diabetes SA members supporters who took part in the 2017 Live It Up Lottery.

The draw took place on Friday 8 December 2017 at Diabetes SA at 1pm and the following tickets were the winners: 

2017 Live It Up Lottery:

First prize $20,000 cash OR VW Polo Urban 7 Speed DSG (automatic) VALUED AT $21,330
Ticket number: 15564

Second prize $3,000 cash
Ticket number: 14913

Third prize $1,000 Westfield Voucher
Ticket number: 01645

Early Bird prize $1,000 – returned a complete sold book by 20 October 2017
Book number: 4434

VIP prize $1,000 – returned a pre-ordered, complete sold book
Book number: 5494

Congratulations to all of the lucky winners!

Join our VIP list

Stand by for the next exciting Diabetes SA lottery with details to be announced shortly.

Increase your chances of winning by entering our VIP list

  • To avoid disappointment don't forget to register as a VIP for our next lottery commencing in February 2018.
  • If you register as a VIP for our next lottery by Friday 29 January 2018 you have the chance to win a $150 IKEA voucher.
  • Would you like to receive a number of books and get your workplace, sports or community club involved? Call 8354 5812 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Join our VIP list

Licence No M13354. Number of tickets 60,000. Conducted by Diabetes SA. Proceeds in aid of information, support and education. Drawn 1.00pm 8 December 2017 at Diabetes SA, 159 Sir Donald Bradman Drive, Hilton SA 5033. Results published in the Advertiser on 13 December 2017. Prizes not transferable or redeemable for cash. 

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Christmas trading hours

christmas-treeDiabetes SA would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and a safe and healthy New Year.

Diabetes SA Retail Shop

Diabetes SA will be closed from Friday 22 December 2017 (5pm) until Tuesday 2 January 2018 when we resume our normal trading hours.

Diabetes Information Line

Got a question? Call 1300 136 588

Please be advised that the Diabetes Information Line will continue to operate over the Christmas closure period, including Saturdays mornings and public holidays, for NDSS enquiries and general diabetes and product information.

This is not an emergency service and if you require immediate help please call your doctor or an ambulance.

Urgent medical advice and Christmas holidays

emergencyIf you require urgent medical advice throughout the Christmas holidays, contact Health Direct on 1800 022 222 (available 24hrs) or visit your nearest hospital emergency department.

Your nearest NDSS Access Point 

You can search the NDSS Online Services Directory for a list of NDSS Access Points in your area.

Click here to find your nearest NDSS Access Point.

 
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Keeping you and your medications safe over the summer holidays

travelling-summerGoing on a road trip with the family? Going interstate or overseas with friends? Summer is the perfect time to unwind, relax and re-charge with a well-earned holiday adventure.

But hot summer temperatures can adversely affect medication and other diabetes supplies, so a little bit of extra planning around correct storage of your medication, blood glucose strips and meters can help prepare you for a safe and enjoyable holiday experience.

Storing your oral medications

Oral diabetes medications must be stored according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. If storage conditions fall outside of these recommendations, the quality of the medication may deteriorate.

The majority of medications only require storage at room temperature, which is typically less than 25 – 30°C. It is therefore important to keep medications away from direct sunlight. For example, don’t keep medication in any part of your car for extended periods of time, including the dashboard, glove box or boot.

If you are flying, keep your medication in your carry-on bag. This ensures that you are able to access your medication during the fl ight and if your checked bags get lost, you still have your medication with you. Also, the bag storage area of the plane can get very hot or very cold which is not good storage condition for your medication.

Storing your insulin and other injectable medications

Insulin and exenatide (Byetta/ Bydureon) also have recommended storage conditions as outlined by their manufacturer. For these medications, the best place for long-term storage prior to opening, is in their original carton, in the fridge at 2°C to 8°C.

Once opened, insulin, Byetta and Bydureon can safely be kept out of the fridge at room temperature (less than 30°C for insulin and Bydureon and less than 25°C for Byetta) for up to 28 days.

Never store insulin, Byetta or Bydureon in the freezer, or in the direct sunlight for example in the glove box of a car. Most of the time, you will be able to store them in your normal travel bag.

If flying, the same recommendations as those outlined for oral medications apply. It is also important to remember that once insulin, Byetta or Bydureon are kept outside of the fridge for longer than 28 days, even if unopened, their potency is not guaranteed and they should be discarded.

What about your blood glucose monitoring equipment?

It is important that your blood glucose meter and blood glucose strips are kept at room temperature. It is well documented that storing blood glucose strips at high temperatures or high humidity can shorten the life of the strips, leading to unreliable blood glucose results.

This error may be large, and usually the meters are unable to detect whether there is a problem with the affected strips. Therefore, blood glucose strips should not be left in a hot car or exposed to other environmental elements such as rain and snow. This also applies to your blood glucose meter where extremes in temperature affect meter accuracy.

All meters are sensitive to heat and cold and must be protected from extreme changes in temperature and humidity. As with other electronic devices, blood glucose meters must be protected from moisture, so keep them away from water.

How to pack your diabetes supplies for the trip

If you are visiting a very warm place these summer holidays, you should protect your supplies by keeping them in a small insulated bag. A cool pack that can be re-frozen may be useful, if going on longer day trips. Enjoy your summer holidays!

Other things to consider during the summer holiday heat

The heat of summer may affect your blood glucose levels, but it is also very much dependant on what you have eaten, whether you are well hydrated and how active you have been.

These extra tips may ensure that you have a safe, enjoyable holiday:

  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated – always have a water bottle handy to prevent dehydration.
  • Monitor your blood glucose levels more frequently – hot temperatures can cause unexpected fluctuations in blood glucose levels.
  • Carry your ‘hypo’ treatment for those of you who are using insulin or glucose lowering medication, sulfonylurea (refer page 14) remember to carry your hypo treatment with you.
  • Be sun smart — don’t forget to wear your high-factor sunscreen, wear protective clothing, a hat and sunglasses, and limit the amount of time that you spend in the direct sunlight; seek shade whenever possible.

Read the original article 

Click here to read the original article. Author: Susan Bellman CDE. Published in Diabetes SA Living Magazine – November 2016, page 16-17.

Additional information 

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Making a Medical Breakthrough: Type 1 Diabetes and the 3D Printing Revolution

3D printing promises to rewrite the playbook for treating Type 1 Diabetes thanks to the 3D Printer Islet Cell Transplantation (PICT) Pen.

The Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) is the first hospital in Australia to get its own 3D PICT Pen and you're invited to a presentation from the key players responsible for its innovation, fabrication and use in transplantation.

Presenters

  • Professor Gordon Wallace, Director of the Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Executive Director at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electro-materials Science, Australian Laureate Fellow and 2016 winner of CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Innovation and Science.
  • Professor Toby Coates, Director of Kidney and Islet Transplantation – RAH, Professor of Medicine at University of Adelaide, transplant physician, nephrologist and leading researcher in the field of transplantation
  • Rosie Hicks, CEO, Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF) – the ANFF was established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, and links 8 university-based nodes to provide researchers and industry with access to state-of-the-art fabrication facilities.
  • Juewan Kim, PHD candidate, Health and Medical Sciences Faculty, University of Adelaide

Event details

  • Date: Wednesday 6 December
  • Time: 12pm – 1:30pm
  • Venue: Royal Adelaide Hospital, corner North Terrace and West Terrace, Adelaide
  • Cost: This event is free but tickets are required for entry for all attendees
  • Click here to register.
 
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Travelling with diabetes — Personal story

travellerMark is 31 years old, works as a physiotherapist and is a seasoned traveller. Mark has had diabetes "live with him" for 19 years and currently administers insulin via an insulin pump.

About Mark

When Mark was 22 he set off on a 2 year European adventure on a work visa. He certainly made the most of this time and his new found freedom by exploring many countries including England, Scotland, France, Spain, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Portugal, Italy, Malta, Croatia, Hungary, Belgium, Netherlands, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Austria, Monaco, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland and Turkey!

Getting off the beaten track

Since his first adventure at a very young age he has had the opportunity to back pack through South America, North America, Asia and Northern Africa on a couple of different big trips from 2009 until 2012. His favourite part of travelling is ‘getting off the beaten track’ especially in continents like South America and Asia. He describes these countries as offering wonderful countryside and undiscovered little villages that home incredibly genuine, friendly and welcoming people. These people are usually very poor. Mark believes that these experiences make you realise that you can live a very simple life but also be very happy.

Enjoying active adventures

During his travels Mark has trekked the Everest base camp in Nepal, Machu Picchu in Peru and an amazing 6000m in the Andes in Bolivia. He has surfed in Norway and the Philippines, snowboarded in Canada, USA, Norway and Switzerland and sailed in Croatia. He has also been deep sea diving in Columbia and mountain scrambling on Volcano’s in Peru and Columbia!

His favourite travel destination

This is a hard one for Mark to answer, as you can imagine. He loves Columbia for its incredible variety (stunning Caribbean coast, amazon jungle/basin, Andes mountains, huge volcanos, coffee fiends and amazing people), and Nepal for its sheer vastness and beauty of the Himalayas and simple living. On the whole for continents he loves South America for the pure variety of landscapes, amazing cultures and people... plus the food!

Mark's advice for those keen travellers

“Just do it!! As long as you are prepared when you go, even with major unexpected circumstances you should be fine with your diabetes control and supplies.“

How Mark prepares for his travels

When preparing for a trip Mark believes that the most important thing without doubt is thorough preparation before you head off. Before he heads off overseas he always follows this simple checklist.

Mark's checklist for traveling

  1. Very simply, take at least double everything you think you may need (2 finger prickers, double pump consumables, batteries, double the insulin etc.)
  2. Have back up for your insulin delivery: I take a couple of insulin pens and supplies in case something unforeseen happens with my pump...which has happened before. I had one pickpocketed (somehow!?) at a party in Brazil.
  3. When travelling on planes take all of your insulin on board with you to avoid the insulin freezing or getting too cold in the cargo section.
  4. When travelling I always keep my diabetes gear separated between my main travel pack/locker and day-pack so that if one bag gets stolen or lost you always have a full supply elsewhere.
  5. Use your insulin / diabetes consumables evenly between your two supplies incase you lose one lot and the other is very low.
  6. I am aware it is recommended to keep your insulin refrigerated whenever possible and I agree with this, but I want to share that on two trips over 12 months I've kept my insulin unrefrigerated (due mainly to no regular availability) in insulated lunch boxes from the supermarket and insulin efficiency has not changed at all. You still need to be aware of avoiding extreme temperatures at both ends of the spectrum of course.
  7. Also be aware that if you are going to be in England for an extended amount of time, you can register with a doctor there and through the NHS get free insulin and diabetes consumables.
  8. Because my pump is Medtronic, I also have a couple of cards with contact offices around the world and their phone numbers, and also carry the email of my Australian contact person.

Additional information

 
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